[Discussioni] Fwd: Meet the DRM drones: help us shame these anti-freedom lobbyists

Francesco Potortì pot a potorti.it
Gio 4 Giu 2015 10:56:36 CEST


Sulle conseguenze del DMCA e presto, probabilmente, del TRIP.

------- Start of forwarded message -------
Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2015 21:42:53 -0400
From: "DefectiveByDesign.org" <info a defectivebydesign.org>
Subject: Meet the DRM drones: help us shame these anti-freedom lobbyists
To: pot <pot a gnu.org>
Reply-to: "DefectiveByDesign.org" <info a defectivebydesign.org>

These DRM offenders tried to squelch anti-circumvention exemptions;
let them know that DRM is always wrong.

The commenting period for the [DMCA's broken anti-circumvention
exemptions
process](https://www.defectivebydesign.org/end-DMCA-anti-circumvention-provisions)
has drawn to a close. As the Copyright Office mulls over all the filed
comments before determining which exemptions to grant or uphold for
the next three years, we want to take a moment to draw attention to
those organizations and individuals scheming to promote Digital
Restrictions Management (DRM). These groups filed comments opposing
exemptions to the DMCA's draconian anti-circumvention
provisions—provisions that can land users in jail simply for sharing
tools that allow others to enjoy the software and devices they own.

While most DRM supporters hid behind the veil of trade associations,
some companies publicly threw their weight behind the nastiest
provision of the DMCA. Many have [made
note](http://www.wired.com/2015/04/dmca-ownership-john-deere/) of John
Deere's absurd attempts to prevent farmers from repairing—let alone
modifying—the tractors they purchased. General Motors, still reeling
from the many deaths caused by faulty ignition switches, likewise took
the time to let the Copyright Office know that they don't want drivers
to have basic access to the software running their cars. While the
ignition switch issue was purely physical, General Motors hid the
problem for years. This example clearly demonstrates that users cannot
trust a single company to be the sole guardian of their safety. Users
should be free to have the software on their vehicles audited or
fixed by anyone, and not be forced by law to simply trust the
manufacturer.

Like trucks and tractors, many appliances and devices we use in our
daily lives rely on software to function. If we don't control our own
devices and software, then we give that control up to the companies
that make them. If we can't access the software in our vehicles, we
leave control of our safety to car companies. If we can't turn off
restrictions on our software and media, we could be left with a future
where access to our cultural heritage is simply not possible. If we
can't turn off controls on our medical devices, then security
researchers won't be able to protect us. Every company or trade
association that supports DMCA anti-circumvention controls is
supporting a system where they are in sole control of the software we
all rely on to live. Every comment opposing exemptions is an affront
to freedom and self-determination that goes beyond arguing against one
specific exemption. To deny any exemption is to support the coercion
fundamental to all DRM.

While the DMCA is a U.S. law, that regulation has worldwide
impact. Devices and software locked down in the U.S. are sold globally
and the companies and organizations pushing DRM in the States are also
conspiring to spread the regulatory damage elsewhere, including via
the secret [TPP
negotiations](https://www.fsf.org/blogs/licensing/latest-tpp-leak-shows-systemic-threat-to-software-freedom). These
are global organizations who threaten user freedom everywhere, and
they must be stopped.

We need to let these organizations know that supporting DRM in any
format will not be tolerated. We have listed [contact
information](Contact info for each commenter is listed [at the end of
the post](https://www.defectivebydesign.org/meet-the-drm-drones). Each
contact also contains a list of links to the comments made in favor of
DRM.)  for the companies, organizations, and individuals who opposed
exemptions to the DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions. Please take a
moment to contact one or more of these DRM supporters and let them
know what you think about their actions. We've prepared a template
email message you can use, or you can craft your own.

Dear [Offender Name],

I am writing to you in regards to your comments sent to the Copyright
Office in opposition to proposed exemptions to the Digital Millennium
Copyright Act's (DMCA) anti-circumvention provisions. The DMCA's
anti-circumvention rules penalize and potentially criminalize users'
rights to avoid Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM threatens
the autonomy and safety of users. Users shouldn't have to rely on the
manufacturer or developer for their own security; they have the right
to have that software audited by another company or
organization. Threatening those users for freeing themselves from
controls over their own software and devices is outrageous. I cannot
support any individual or organization that would actively seek to
undermine the right of users to control their own computing. Rather
than trying to restrict what users can do with the devices and
software they own and control, you should defend their right to do so
by asking your legislators to repeal the DMCA's anti-circumvention
provisions altogether. I support the Defective by Design campaign to
end DRM and you should too. You must renounce your support for DRM and
for the DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions. Until then, I cannot
support anything that you do.

[Your Signature Here]

If you microblog, please share the following message (or your own)
with the hashtag #DRMshame. We strongly suggest that if you use
[Twitter](https://www.fsf.org/twitter) to publicly call these people
out, you do it in a way that avoids using proprietary software:

@[offender name] You should be ashamed of yourself for supporting
Digital Restrictions Management #DRM-shame (shortened link to post)

Contact info for each commenter is listed [at the end of the
post online](https://www.defectivebydesign.org/meet-the-drm-drones). Each
contact also contains a list of links to the comments made in favor of
DRM.

You can browse through all the opposition comments
[here](http://copyright.gov/1201/2015/comments-032715/).

Donald Robertson 
Copyright and Licensing Associate

Read this online:
<https://www.defectivebydesign.org/meet-the-drm-drones>
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